Medicaid claims data to supplement Zika-related birth defects case identification

As a part of the Zika Birth Defects Surveillance, a national effort coordinated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), NYC is conducting enhanced surveillance of all births with defects included in the congenital Zika syndrome (CZS) phenotype among infants born in NYC beginning in 2016. The intent of the project is to provide background on the prevalence of these conditions, regardless of cause.

January 25, 2018

NBIC Collaboration at Multiple Jurisdictional Levels During the Zika Epidemic

NBIC is charged with enhancing the capability of the Federal Government to enable early warning and shared situational awareness of acute biological events to support better decisions through rapid identification, characterization, localization, and tracking. A key aspect of this mission is the requirement to integrate and collaborate with federal and, state, local, tribal, and territorial (SLTT) government agencies.

January 25, 2018

Syndromic Surveillance Climate and Health Guidance Document

In general, data from public health surveillance can be used for short- and long-term planning and response through retrospective data analysis of trends over time or specific events. Combining health outcome data (e.g., hospitalizations or deaths) with environmental and socio-demographic information also provides a more complete picture of most vulnerable populations. Using syndromic surveillance systems for climate and health surveillance offers the unique opportunity to help quantify and track in near-real time the burden of disease from climate and weather impacts.

September 19, 2017

Estimated range of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti in the United States, 2017

CDC has updated the estimated range maps for Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes by using a model that predicts possible geographic ranges for these mosquitoes in the contiguous United States. The model used county-level records, historical records, and suitable climate variables to predict the likelihood (very low, low, moderate, or high) that these mosquitoes could survive and reproduce if introduced to an area during the months when mosquitoes are locally active. Maps are not meant to represent risk for spread of any specific disease

October 13, 2017

Primer: Emergency Legal Preparedness Concerning Zika Virus

This Primer, developed by the Network for Public Health Law and posted on June 5, 2017, outlines major public health concerns underlying Zika virus and discusses legal preparedness and response issues. These include legal issues related to testing and screening, surveillance and reporting, public health preparedness, mosquito abatement, liability and insurance, and maternal and child health. 

June 05, 2017

A Syndrome Definition Validation Approach for Zika Virus

In 2016, the World Health Organization declared Zika virus a global public health emergency. Zika infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly and other fetal brain defects. To facilitate clinicians’ ability to detect Zika, various syndrome definitions have been developed. 

Objective

To develop and validate a Zika virus disease syndrome definition within the GUARDIAN (Geographic Utilization of Artificial Intelligence in Real-Time for Disease Identification and Alert Notification) surveillance system.

May 26, 2017

Georgia’s Rapid Expansion of Mosquito Surveillance in Response to Zika Virus

Zika virus was declared an international public health emergency by the World Health Organization on February 1, 2016. With Georgia hosting the world’s busiest international airport and a sub- tropical climate that can support the primary Zika virus vector, Aedes aegypti, and secondary vector, Aedes albopictus, the CDC designated Georgia as a high risk state for vector transmission. Faced with a lack of mosquito surveillance data to evaluate risk of autochthonous transmission and a few counties statewide that provide comprehensive mosquito control, the DPH rapidly scaled up a response.

June 19, 2017

Houston Health Department’s response to the threat of Zika virus

Zika virus spread quickly through South and Central America in 2015. The City of Houston saw its first travel-related Zika cases in December of 2015. On January 29th, the City held the first planning meeting with regional partners from healthcare, blood banks, petrochemical companies, mosquito control, and others. Additionally the City activated Incident Command Structure (ICS) and designated the Public Health Authority as the Incident Commander.

July 06, 2017

Kidenga: Public engagement for detection and prevention of Aedes -borne viral diseases

Zika, chikungunya, and dengue have surged in the Americas over the past several years and pose serious health threats in regions of the U.S. where Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquito vectors occur. Ae. aegypti have been detected up to 6 months of the year or longer in parts of Arizona, Florida, and Texas where mosquito surveillance is regularly conducted. However, many areas in the U.S. lack basic data on vector presence or absence.

July 10, 2017

Monitoring for Local Transmission of Zika Virus using Emergency Department Data

The first travel-associated cases of Zika virus infection in New York City (NYC) were identified in January 2016. Local transmission of Zika virus from imported cases is possible due to presence of Aedes albopictus mosquitos. Timely detection of local Zika virus transmission could inform public health interventions and mitigate additional spread of illness. Daily emergency department (ED) visit surveillance to detect individual cases and spatio-temporal clusters of locally-acquired Zika virus disease was initiated in June 2016. 

Objective

July 16, 2017

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This Knowledge Repository is made possible through the activities of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cooperative Agreement/Grant #1 NU500E000098-01, National Surveillance Program Community of Practice (NSSP-CoP): Strengthening Health Surveillance Capabilities Nationwide, which is in the interest of public health.

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