Customizing ESSENCE Queries for Select Mental Health Sub-indicators

Syndromic surveillance systems, although initially developed in response to bioterrorist threats, are increasingly being used at the local, state, and national level to support early identification of infectious disease and other emerging threats to public health. To facilitate detection, one of the goals of CDC's National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is to develop and share new sets of syndrome codes with the syndromic surveillance Community of Practice.

June 18, 2019

Monitoring suicide-related events using National Syndromic Surveillance Program data

Suicide is a growing public health problem in the United States. From 2001 to 2016, ED visit rates for nonfatal self-harm, a common risk factor for suicide, increased 42%.

June 18, 2019

Utilization History of Emergency Medical Services Among West Virginia Drug Overdose Decedents

West Virginia continues to lead the nation in drug overdose deaths per capita. In 2016, the age-adjusted rate of drug overdose deaths was 52 per 100,0001. In the same year, there were roughly 64,000 overdose deaths in the United States, a 21.5% rate increase from 20151. The drug overdose epidemic in West Virginia has taken a significant toll on individuals, families, communities, and resources.

June 18, 2019

Detection of a Salmonellosis Outbreak using Syndromic Surveillance in Georgia

Evidence about the value of syndromic surveillance data for outbreak detection is limited. In July 2018, a salmonellosis outbreak occurred following a family reunion of 300 persons held in Camden County, Georgia, where one meal was served on 7/27/2018 and on 7/28/2018.

Objective: Describe how the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) used data from its State Electronic Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (SendSS) Syndromic Surveillance (SS) module for early detection of an outbreak of salmonellosis in Camden County, Georgia.

June 18, 2019

National Surveillance for Health-Related Workplace Absenteeism, United States 2017-18

During an influenza pandemic, when hospitals and doctors'™ offices are or are perceived to be overwhelmed, many ill people may not seek medical care. People may also avoid medical facilities due to fear of contracting influenza or transmitting it to others. Therefore, syndromic methods for monitoring illness outside of health care settings are important adjuncts to traditional disease reporting. Monitoring absenteeism trends in schools and workplaces provide the archetypal examples for such approaches.

June 18, 2019

Utilizing Syndromic Surveillance for Hurricane Irma-Related CO Poisonings in Florida

On September 10, 2017, Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida. Over 90% of Florida counties reported power outages as of September 11. During power outages, CO poisonings often occur due to indoor use of fuel combustion sources (e.g., cooking, heating) or generators for electricity. CO poisoning is a reportable condition in Florida; health care providers and laboratories are required to report suspected cases to the Florida Department of Health (FDOH). In Florida, approximately 202 cases of CO poisoning are reported each year (three-year average from 2014 to 2016).

June 18, 2019

Disease Surveillance System of Bangladesh: Combating Public Health Emergencies

Disease surveillance is an integral part of public health system. It is an epidemiological method for monitoring disease patterns and trends. International Health Regulation (IHR) 2005 obligates WHO member countries to develop an effective disease surveillance system. Bangladesh is a signatory to IHR 2005. Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research (IEDCR ) is the mandated institute for surveillance and outbreak response on behalf of Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh.

June 18, 2019

Precision public health through clinic-based syndromic surveillance in communities

In December 2009, Taiwan’s CDC stopped its sentinel physician surveillance system. Currently, infectious disease surveillance systems in Taiwan rely on not only the national notifiable disease surveillance system but also real-time outbreak and disease surveillance (RODS) from emergency rooms, and the outpatient and hospitalization surveillance system from National Health Insurance data. However, the timeliness of data exchange and the number of monitored syndromic groups are limited. The spatial resolution of monitoring units is also too coarse, at the city level.

June 18, 2019

Enhancing Drug Overdose Alerts with Spatial Visualization

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana, and the gap continues to widen1. While federal funding opportunities are available for states, it often takes years for best practices to be developed, shared, and published. Similarly, local health departments (LHDs) may experience lengthy delays to receive finalized county health statistics.

June 18, 2019

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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