Informatics & Surveillance in Global Health: Informatics Capacity for Zika Outbreak

In response to the February 2016 Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak, an inter-agency agreement between the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) commissioned further research on the epidemiology, transmission, diagnosis, and birth defects associated with ZIKV.

June 18, 2019

Using Syndromic Surveillance and Climatic Data to Detect High Intensity HFMD Seasons

Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a highly infectious disease common among early childhood populations caused by human enteroviruses (Enterovirus genus).1 The enteroviruses responsible for HFMD generally cause mild illness among children in the United States with symptoms of fever and rash/blisters, but have also been linked to small outbreaks of severe neurological disease such as meningitis, encephalitis, and acute flaccid myelitis.2 Enteroviruses circulate year-round but increase in the summer-fall months across much of the United States.3 The drivers of this seasonality are not fully und

June 18, 2019

Jurisdictional Etiquette Workgroup: An offshoot of a Syndromic Surveillance Consortium

Syndromic data is shifting the way surveillance has been done traditionally. Most recently, surveillance has gone beyond city limits and county boundary lines. In southeast Texas, a regional consortium of public health agencies and stakeholders in the 13-County area governs the local ESSENCE system. The Houston Health Department, (HHD) is responsible for deploying ESSENCE to the entire region.

June 18, 2019

Using Syndromic Surveillance Data to Aid Public Health Actions in Tennessee

Syndromic surveillance data is typically used for the monitoring of symptom combinations in patient chief complaints (i.e. syndromes) or health indicators within a population to inform public health actions. The Tennessee Department of Health collects emergency department (ED) data from more than 80 hospitals across Tennessee to support statewide situational awareness. Most hospitals in Tennessee provide data within 48 hours of the patient being seen in the emergency department.

June 18, 2019

Approach to Onboarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Data Into a Syndromic Surveillance System

Syndromic surveillance has become an integral component of public health surveillance efforts within the state of Florida. The near real-time nature of these data are critical during events such as the Zika virus outbreak in Florida in 2016 and in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in 2017. Additionally, syndromic surveillance data are utilized to support daily reportable disease detection and other surveillance efforts.

June 18, 2019

Monitoring and Improving Syndromic Surveillance Data Quality

The public health problem identified by Alabama Department of Public Health Syndromic Surveillance (AlaSyS) was that the data reflected in the user application of ESSENCE (Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics) was underestimating occurrences of syndromic alerts preventing Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) from timely recognition of potential public health threats.

June 18, 2019

Using Syndromic Surveillance to Classify and Capture Non-Fatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

This study uses data from the New Jersey syndromic surveillance system (EpiCenter) as a data source to enhance surveillance of current non-fatal occupational injuries, illnesses, and poisonings. EpiCenter was originally developed for early detection and monitoring of the health of communities using chief complaints from people seeking acute care in hospital emergency rooms to identify health trends. Currently, syndromic surveillance has not been widely applied to identify occupational injuries and illnesses.

June 18, 2019

Camera-based, mobile disease surveillance using Convolutional Neural Networks

Infectious diseases present with multifarious factors requiring several efforts to detect, prevent, and break the chain of transmission. Recently, machine learning has shown to be promising for automated surveillance leading to rapid and early interventions, and extraction of phenotypic features of human faces. In addition, mobile devices have become a promising tool to provide on-the-ground surveillance, especially in remote areas and geolocation mapping.

June 18, 2019

Monitoring Heat-Related Illness through Syndromic Surveillance in Los Angeles County

LAC experienced several days of record-breaking temperatures during the summer of 2018. Downtown Los Angeles temperatures soared to 108°F in July with an average daily maximum of 92°F. Extreme heat events such as these can pose major risks to human health. Syndromic surveillance can be a useful tool in providing near real-time surveillance of HRI. In 2014, a working group was formed within the CSTE Climate Change Subcommittee to define and analyze HRI.

June 18, 2019

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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