UPDATED: Syndromic Surveillance 101 - An Introductory Course in Syndromic Surveillance

An Online Training Course

Ever wonder what syndromic surveillance is? How it is applied? This introduction to syndromic surveillance answers your questions and gives you a foundation for understanding how surveillance is used by public health professionals to understand health threats.

 

This video introduces the viewer to the basics of syndromic surveillance and offers a high-level overview of the many uses of this public health tool. Topics covered in this training include:

November 29, 2018

Tablet-based participatory syndromic surveillance at Simhashta festival in India

Infectious disease surveillance for generating early warnings to enable a prompt response during mass gatherings has long been a challenge in India as well as in other parts of the world. Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh in Central India hosted one of the largest religious festival in the world called ‘Simhasth kumbh mela’ on the banks of River Kshipra, where more than 50 million attendees came for holy dip during April 22 to May 21, 2016. The attendees included pilgrims (residents and visitors), observers, officials and volunteers.

January 21, 2018

Updating syndromic surveillance baselines following public health interventions

Public Health England's syndromic surveillance service monitor presentations for gastrointestinal illness to detect increases in health care seeking behaviour driven by infectious gastrointestinal disease. We use regression models to create baselines for expected activity and then identify any periods of signficant increases. The introduction of a rotavirus vaccine in England during July 2013 (Bawa, Z. et al. 2015) led to a reduction in incidence of the disease, requiring a readjustment of baselines.

Objective:

January 21, 2018

A pilot project to identify individuals who died from suicide and visited an ED before death

In 2015, suicide was the 8th leading cause of death in Salt Lake County, Utah, and has recently been identified as a priority public health issue. For suicide, suicide ideation and suicide attempts surveillance, Salt Lake County Health Department staff use National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) mortality data to monitor historical trends and vital records mortality data and ESSENCE ED encounter morbidity data to monitor trends and populations in real time.

January 25, 2018

Using Drug Overdose Syndromic Surveillance Data to Impact Local Public Health Action

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana and the gap continues to widen1. As the opioid crisis rages on in the United States the federal government is providing funding opportunities to states, but it often takes years for best practices to be developed, shared, and published. Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) has developed a standard process for monitoring and alerting local health partners of increases in drug overdoses captured in Indiana’s syndromic surveillance system (ESSENCE).

January 21, 2018

A proposed SyS Case Definition for Opioid Overdose Related ED visits- an evaluation in three regions

Opioid ODs have been rising globally and nationally. The death rate from ODs in the United States has increased 137% since 2000, including a 200% increase of OD deaths involving opioids1. The pilot project, a collaboration across 3 states, allowed information sharing with Syndromic surveillance (SyS) partners across jurisdictions, such as sharing a standard SyS case definition and verifying its applicability in each jurisdiction. This is a continuation of the work from an initial pilot project presented during the ISDS Opioid OD Webinar series.

Objective:

January 25, 2018

Using Syndromic Data for Opioid Overdose Surveillance in Utah

The current surveillance system for opioid-related overdoses at UDOH has been limited to mortality data provided by the Office of the Medical Examiner (OME). Timeliness is a major concern with OME data due to the considerable lag in its availability, often up to six months or more. To enhance opioid overdose surveillance, UDOH has implemented additional surveillance using timely syndromic data to monitor fatal and nonfatal opioid-related overdoses in Utah.

Objective:

January 21, 2018

Improving Syndromic Data Quality through Implementation of Error Capture Module

Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD), in collaboration with The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, implemented Oregon ESSENCE in 2011. ESSENCE is an automated, electronic syndromic surveillance system that captures emergency department data from hospitals across Oregon. While each hospital system sends HL7 2.5.1-formatted messages, each uses a uniquely configured interface to capture, extract, and send data. Consequently, ESSENCE receives messages that vary greatly in content and structure.

January 25, 2018

ED visits for AMI, Stroke, ACS & COPD after the Statewide Smoking Ban in Cook Co., IL

Tobacco use is the leading global cause of preventable death, killing more than five million people per year. In addition, exposure to secondhand smoke is estimated to kill an additional 600,000 people globally each year. In 1986, the US Surgeon General’s Report declared secondhand smoke to be a cause of lung cancer in healthy nonsmokers. The first law restricting smoking in public places was enacted in 1973 in Arizona that followed the 1972 Surgeon General’s Report providing awareness of the negative health effects associated with the exposure to air pollution from tobacco smoke.

January 21, 2018

ED and poison center surveillance for the Great American Solar Eclipse in Oregon

Oregon’s statewide syndromic surveillance system (Oregon ESSENCE) has been operational since 2012. Non-federal emergency department data (and several of their associated urgent care centers) are the primary source for the system, although other data sources have been added, including de-identified call data from OPC in 2016. OPHD epidemiologists have experience monitoring mass gatherings and have a strong relationship with OPC, collaborating on a regular basis for routine and heightened public health surveillance.

January 25, 2018

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INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR
DISEASE SURVEILLANCE

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Email:syndromic@syndromic.org

This Knowledge Repository is made possible through the activities of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cooperative Agreement/Grant #1 NU500E000098-01, National Surveillance Program Community of Practice (NSSP-CoP): Strengthening Health Surveillance Capabilities Nationwide, which is in the interest of public health.

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