Data Sharing Through Dashboards: The Who, What, Where, When, and Why

Presented April 26, 2019.

Description: Join us for this lightning talk webinar experience where you will see multiple examples of data dashboards and learn more about who they were created for, how they were developed, where and when the data is being shared, and what impact the dashboard has had on improving public health practice. We will hear from 5 presenters from around the public health community as they discuss their work on opioid, flu, and general disease surveillance dashboards.

Presenters addressed the following questions:

April 30, 2019

Turning the Tide on the Opioid Epidemic

Presenters

Susan Robinson, Vaccine-Preventable Disease Epidemiologist, Arizona Department of Health Services

Erica Weis, Injury Prevention Epidemiologist, Arizona Department of Health Services

Background

March 27, 2019

Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) Program Overview

These slides were presented at the Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) Program Overview Partner meeting, led by CDC and organized by ASTHO in March of 2019. 

Presenters

Puja Seth, PhD – Lead, Epidemiology and Surveillance

Alana Vivolo-Kantor, PhD – Morbidity Lead

Christine L. Mattson, PhD – Mortality Lead

Objectives

March 27, 2019

Fact Sheet: Naloxone Access and Overdose Good Samaritan Law in Ohio

This fact sheet, developed by the Network for Public Health Law and published August 29, 2018, summarizes Ohio's laws to combat the opioid overdose crisis.

Read more about this resource at https://www.networkforphl.org/resources_collection/2018/08/29/1027/naloxone_access_and_overdose_good_samaritan_law_in_ohio?blm_aid=193546.

August 31, 2018

State Opioid Overdose Surveillance Dashboards

Below are the publicly available opioid overdose surveillance dashboards by U.S. state or territory. This list is updated as of March 7, 2019.

June 22, 2018

Heroin Overdose Hospitalization Risk due to Prescription Opioids using PDMP in WI.

Nationally and in Wisconsin, heroin is the leading cause of opioid related death and hospitalization. Opioids are commonly prescribed for pain. Every day, over 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids. In 2015, more than 15,000 people died from overdoses involving prescription opioids. Approximately, three out of four heroin users report having abused prescription opioids prior to using heroin. In Wisconsin from 2010 to 2014 the number of deaths involving any opioid increased by 51% and for heroin increased by 192%.

January 21, 2018

Opioid Surveillance using Social Media: How URLs are shared among Reddit members

Nearly 100 people per day die from opioid overdose in the United States. Further, prescription opioid abuse is assumed to be responsible for a 15-year increase in opioid overdose deaths. However, with increasing use of social media comes increasing opportunity to seek and share information. For instance, 80% of Internet users obtain health information online, including popular social interaction sites like Reddit (http://www.reddit.com), which had more than 82.5 billion page views in 20153.

January 21, 2018

Using Drug Overdose Syndromic Surveillance Data to Impact Local Public Health Action

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana and the gap continues to widen1. As the opioid crisis rages on in the United States the federal government is providing funding opportunities to states, but it often takes years for best practices to be developed, shared, and published. Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) has developed a standard process for monitoring and alerting local health partners of increases in drug overdoses captured in Indiana’s syndromic surveillance system (ESSENCE).

January 21, 2018

Tracking Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome in Missouri: Trends and the ICD-CM Transition

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) rates have tripled for Missouri residents in the past three years. NAS is a condition infants suffer soon after birth due to withdrawal after becoming opioid-dependent in the womb. NAS has significant immediate health concerns and can have long term effects on child development and quality of life.

January 21, 2018

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INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR
DISEASE SURVEILLANCE

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Email:syndromic@syndromic.org

This Knowledge Repository is made possible through the activities of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cooperative Agreement/Grant #1 NU500E000098-01, National Surveillance Program Community of Practice (NSSP-CoP): Strengthening Health Surveillance Capabilities Nationwide, which is in the interest of public health.

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