Identification and Assessment of Repeat Drug Overdose Visits at EDs in Virginia

The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) utilizes syndromic surveillance ED data to measure morbidity associated with opioid and heroin overdoses among Virginia residents. Understanding which individuals within a population use ED services for repeated drug overdose events may help guide the use of limited resources towards the most effective treatment and prevention efforts.

June 18, 2019

Identifying Emergency Department Care in the Year Prior to Suicide Death

Suicide is a leading cause of mortality in the United States, causing about 45,000 deaths annually. Research suggests that universal screening in health care settings may be beneficial for prevention, but few studies have combined detailed suicide circumstances with ED encounter data to better understand care-seeking behavior prior to death.

Objective: To identify potential emergency department (ED) visits prior to suicide deaths in North Carolina (NC) and describe pre-suicide care-seeking in EDs.

June 18, 2019

Monitoring Sexual Violence Visits in Emergency Department Data to Improve Public Health

Although sexual violence is a pressing public health and safety issue, it has historically been challenging to monitor population trends with precision. Approximately 31% of incidents of sexual violence are reported to law enforcement and only 5% lead to an arrest1, making the use of law enforcement data challenging. Syndromic surveillance data from emergency departments provides an opportunity to use care-seeking to more accurately surveil sexual violence without introducing additional burdens on either patients or healthcare providers.

June 18, 2019

Analysis of Emergency Department Visits for Motor Vehicle Injuries in Utah, 2016

Motor vehicle injury is the leading cause of death in injury category in the United States. In 2016, motor vehicle crashes were one of the main causes of death resulting from injury (8.8 per 100,000 population) in Utah. Motor vehicle crashes can lead to physical and economic consequences that impact the lives of individuals and their families. In addition, the treatment of injuries places an enormous burden on hospital Emergency Departments (EDs).

June 18, 2019

Multidimensional Semantic Scan for Pre-Syndromic Disease Surveillance

An interdisciplinary team convened by ISDS to translate public health use-case needs into well-defined technical problems recently identified the need for new pre-syndromic surveillance methods that do not rely on existing syndromes or pre-defined illness categories1.

June 18, 2019

Asthma vs. PM2.5: A Bridge Between Health and Environmental Surveillance.

Southwest states are prone to wildfires, dust storms, and high winds especially during the monsoon season (June- September). Wildfire smoke is a complex mixture of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water vapor, hydrocarbons, nitrogen, oxides, metals, and particulate matter (PM). Dust storms are made up of aerosols and dust particles varying in size; particles bigger than 10 µm are not breathable, but can damage external organs such as causing skin and eye irritations.

June 18, 2019

Opioid Seizures by Law Enforcement in Relation to Emergency Room Visits

In 2016, there were approximately 63,000 deaths nationally due to drug overdose. This trend continues to increase with the provisional number of US deaths for 2017 being approximately 72,000 (1). This increase in overdose deaths is fueled largely by the opioid class of drugs. The opioid epidemic began in the 1990s with a steady rise in prescription opioid overdoses. However, after 2010 a rise in heroin overdose deaths also began to occur.

June 18, 2019

Comparing Syndromic Data to Discharge Data to Measure Opioid Overdose Emergency Department Visits

Timely and accurate measurement of overdose morbidity using emergency department (ED) data is necessary to inform an effective public health response given the dynamic nature of opioid overdose epidemic in the United States. However, from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, differing sources and types of ED data vary in their quality and comprehensiveness. Many jurisdictions collect timely emergency department data through syndromic surveillance (SyS) systems, while others may have access to more complete, but slower emergency department discharge datasets.

June 18, 2019

Optimization of Linkage between North Carolina EMS and ED Data: EMS Naloxone Cases

The opioid overdose crisis has rapidly expanded in North Carolina (NC), paralleling the epidemic across the United States. The number of opioid overdose deaths in NC has increased by nearly 40% each year since 2015.1 Critical to preventing overdose deaths is increasing access to the life-saving drug naloxone, which can reverse overdose symptoms and progression.

June 18, 2019

Customizing ESSENCE Queries for Select Mental Health Sub-indicators

Syndromic surveillance systems, although initially developed in response to bioterrorist threats, are increasingly being used at the local, state, and national level to support early identification of infectious disease and other emerging threats to public health. To facilitate detection, one of the goals of CDC's National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is to develop and share new sets of syndrome codes with the syndromic surveillance Community of Practice.

June 18, 2019

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Contact Us

National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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