Rough Guide to Set up Data Feed for Poison Center Data in Your State

The Oregon ESSENCE team has developed a guide for other states to use to set up a web service link to their poison center and extract its data into ESSENCE. It contains advice based on Oregon’s experience in developing its link with its poison center and NDPS, a plug-&-play (almost) Rhapsody configuration file (and instructions) to install, and data dictionaries provided by NPDS.

The publication date is February 1, 2019.

January 31, 2019

Dengue Surveillance and Control: One Health Case Study

Pakistan being a subtropical region is highly susceptible to water-borne, air-borne and vector-borne infectious diseases (IDs). Each year, millions of its people are exposed to, and infected with, deadly pathogens including hepatitis, tuberculosis, malaria, and now-a-days dengue fever (DF). Monitoring and response management to natural or man-made IDs is non-existent in the country due to lack of robust infrastructure for health surveillance. DF outbreaks in 2005-2011 alone resulted in more than 50,000 infections and about 1500 people lost their lives.

September 29, 2017

Developing a Transdiciplinary Database Template for Operationalization of One Health Surveillance of Japanese Encephalitis and Other Vector Borne Diseases in India

Vector borne diseases like Japanese Encephalitis (JE) result from the convergence of multiple factors, including, but not limited to, human, animal, environmental, and economic and social determinants. Thus, to combat these problems, it is essential to have a systematic understanding of drivers and determinants based on a surveillance system that systematically gathers and analyzes data emanating from across multiple disciplines.

September 29, 2017

One Health Harmful Algal Bloom-related Illness Surveillance

Cyanobacteria and marine algae are ubiquitous in the earth's freshwaters and oceans. Under the right circumstances, these organisms can proliferate, causing harmful algal blooms (HABs) which may produce toxins that threaten human and animal health as well as local and regional ecology. Animals may play in, swim in, or drink from ponds and lakes that have extensive blooms, even if the water bodies smell or look unpleasant to people; the first warning that a toxin-producing HAB exists may come from the death of a pet dog or livestock.

October 05, 2017

EpiCore: Crowdsourcing Health Professionals to Verify Disease Outbreaks

EpiCore draws on the knowledge of a global community of human, animal, and environmental health professionals to verify information on disease outbreaks in their geographic regions. By using innovative surveillance techniques and crowdsourcing these experts, EpiCore enables faster global outbreak detection, verification, and reporting

July 27, 2017

Predicting Acute Respiratory Infections from Participatory Data

ARIs have epidemic and pandemic potential. Prediction of presence of ARIs from individual signs and symptoms in existing studies have been based on clinically-sourced data. Clinical data generally represents the most severe cases, and those from locations with access to healthcare institutions. Thus, the viral information that comes from clinical sampling is insufficient to either capture disease incidence in general populations or its predictability from symptoms.

August 03, 2017

Rapidly Adapting Flexible Surveillance Systems for Emergent Event Response

Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) epidemiologists have responded to multiple emergent outbreaks with diverse surveillance needs. During the 2009 H1N1 influenza response, it was necessary to electronically integrate multiple reporting sources and view population-level data, while during the 2014–2015 West African Ebola epidemic, it was necessary to easily collect and view individual level data from travelers to facilitate early detection of potential imported Ebola disease.

August 03, 2017

Global Health Surveillance: Innovation and Coordination for Broad Health Impact

Multiple agencies are involved in global disease surveillance and coordination of activities is essential to achieve broad public health impact. Multiple examples of effective and collaborative initiatives exist. The WHO/AFRO developed Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) framework, adopted by 43 of the 46 AFRO member states and applied in other WHO regions, was the first framework designed to strengthen national disease surveillance and response systems.

June 19, 2017

Facile Dashboard Creation Using Library of Syndromic Surveillance Visualization Tools

Public health surveillance largely relies on the use of surveillance systems to facilitate the identification and investigation of epidemiologic concerns reflected in data. In order to support public health response, these systems must present relevant information, and be user-friendly, dynamic, and easily-implementable. The abundance of R tools freely-available online for data analysis and visualization presents not only opportunities but also challenges for adoption in that these tools must be integrated so as to allow a structured workflow.

June 19, 2017

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Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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