Welcome to the Surveillance Knowledge Repository

Click on a topic under the Key Topic Areas section in the left column, then select a resource  from the list of resources that appear for that topic. You may also search for specific topics by entering one or more keywords in the Search bar. You can filter the search results by Content Type, Year, or Author Name.

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Syndromic surveillance refers to the monitoring of disease related events, sets of clinical features (i.e. syndromes), or other indicators in a population. Tennessee obtains emergency department data for syndromic surveillance in standardized HL7 format following the field and value set... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Standard syndrome definitions for ED visits in ESSENCE rely on chief complaints. Visits with more words in the chief complaint field are more likely to match syndrome definitions. While using ESSENCE, we observed geographic differences in chief complaint length, apparently related to differences... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Oregon’s statewide syndromic surveillance system (Oregon ESSENCE) has been operational since 2012. Non-federal emergency department data (and several of their associated urgent care centers) are the primary source for the system, although other data sources have been added, including de-... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In November of 2011 BioSense 2.0 went live to provide tools for public health departments to process, store, and analyze meaningful use syndromic surveillance data. In February of 2012 ESSENCE was adapted to support meaningful use syndromic surveillance data and was installed on the Amazon... Read more

Content type: Abstract

This webinar is part of the Meaningful Use Webinar Series entitled "Discovering the New Frontier of Syndromic Surveillance: A Meaningful Use Dialogue"

Amy Kelsey will continue the ISDS Meaningful Use webinar series by discussing Missouri's experience with inpatient EHR data.  Her talk... Read more

Content type: Webinar

The public health problem identified by Alabama Department of Public Health Syndromic Surveillance (AlaSyS) was that the data reflected in the user application of ESSENCE (Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics) was underestimating occurrences of... Read more

Content type: Abstract

NPDS is a near real-time surveillance system and national database operated by the American Association of Poison Control Centers. NPDS receives records of all calls made to the 55 regional US poison centers (PCs). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) use NPDS to 1) provide... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2005, the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) began using the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE) as an emergency department (ED)-based local syndromic surveillance program (LSSP); 23 (100%) of 23 hospitals in suburban... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Louisiana Office of Public Health (OPH) Infectious Disease Epidemiology Section (IDEpi) conducts syndromic surveillance of Emergency Department (ED) visits through the Louisiana Early Event Detection System (LEEDS) and submits the collected data to ESSENCE. There are currently 86 syndromes... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2010, there were 4,796 snake bite exposures reported to Poison Centers nationwide (1). Health care providers frequently request help from poison centers regarding snake envenomations due to the unpredictability and complexity of prognosis and treatment. The Missouri Poison Center (MoPC)... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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