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The 2017-2018 influenza season was the first to be classified as "high severity" across all age groups since 2003.1 Influenza-like illness (ILI) peaked at 7.5%, the highest since the 2009 pandemic.1 It was also the longest season in recent history, coming in at or above the national baseline for... Read more

Content type: Success Stories

This syndrome was designed to capture rabies PEP visits and animal bites (excluding insect, human, snake, arachnid, and fish bites).

The query is designed using ESSENCE syntax (from the query portal)

The query is designed to be run against emergency department and urgent care... Read more

Content type: Syndrome

In winter, people are at risk for cold-related illness (CRI) such as hypothermia. Deaths coded as weather-related from 2006 through 2010 showed exposure to excessive cold as the leading cause of weather-related deaths in the United States.1 Therefore, the National Syndromic Surveillance Program... Read more

Content type: Success Stories

Wisconsin experienced severe flooding from August 17 to September 20, 2018. This flood caused an estimated $232 million in damage and affected 21 counties. Floods can have negative health impacts on a population, such as increased skin infections, communicable diseases, gastroenteritis, and... Read more

Content type: Success Stories

Data latency limited the Alabama Department of Public Health’s (ADPH) ability torecognize and respond quickly to public health threats. Despite ADPH’s request that 95% of syndromic surveillance (SyS) data be submitted to ESSENCE* within 24 hours of a visit, some facilities were slow to process... Read more

Content type: Success Stories

Mass gatherings—defined as events attended by a sufficient number of people to strain the planning and response resources of the host state—pose unique surveillance challenges. Attendees can be at greater (or high) risk for injuries due to event activities or volume of people in an unstructured... Read more

Content type: Success Stories

Louisiana, like other states, grapples with widespread drug abuse. CDC’s DrugOverdose Death Data show Louisiana had a statistically significant 14.7% increase in its drug overdose death rate from 2015–2016. As early as 2013, the Louisiana Office of Public Health, Infectious Disease Epidemiology... Read more

Content type: Success Stories

Zika virus disease became a significant public health problem in Brazil in 2015 and quickly spread to other South American and Central American countries. While not an overly severe illness for many, Zika virus disease has been shown to increase the probability of severe birth defects in babies... Read more

Content type: Success Stories

Uploaded on behalf of Grace Marx, MD, MPH: Bacterial Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, CDC.

 

This syndrome definition was created to explore Lyme disease through Syndromic data as an efficient approach to monitor the disease. 

This was created in NSSP... Read more

Content type: Syndrome

Uploaded on behalf of Grace Marx, MD, MPH: Bacterial Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, CDC.

 

This syndrome definition was created to explore tick through Syndromic data as an efficient approach to monitor the tick-borne diseases and the utility of tick bite... Read more

Content type: Syndrome

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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