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One of the standard approaches to public health surveillance for influenza is to monitor the percent of visits to about 2000 sentinel physicians for influenza-like illness (%ILI; fever plus cough or sore throat). The BioSense System currently receives (among other data) ICD-9 discharge diagnoses... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Varied approaches have been used by syndromic surveillance systems for aberration detection. However, the performance of these methods has been evaluated only across a small range of epidemic characteristics.

 

Objective

We conducted a large simulation study to evaluate the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Analysis of time series data requires accurate calculation of a predicted value. Non-regression methods such as the Early Aberration Reporting System CuSum are computationally simple, but most do not adjust for day of week or holiday. Alternately, regression methods require larger counts, more... Read more

Content type: Abstract

OBJECTIVE

A “whole-system facsimile” recreates a complex automated biosurveillance system running prospectively on real historical datasets. We systematized this approach to compare the performance of otherwise identical surveillance systems that used alternative statistical outbreak... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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