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Presented May 16, 2019.

After the major impact of the 2003 heat wave, France needed a reactive, permanent and national surveillance system enabling to detect and to follow-up various public health events all over the territory including overseas. In June 2004, the French syndromic... Read more

Content type: Webinar

Maryland’s electronic surveillance system for the early notification of community-based epidemics (ESSENCE) data includes emergency department visits from all acute care hospitals, over-the-counter medication sales and poison control data that cover all jurisdictions in Maryland. Maryland... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Twitter is a free social networking and micro-blogging service that enables its millions of users to send and read each other’s ‘tweets’, or short messages limited to 140 characters. The service has more than 190 million registered users and processes about 55 million tweets per day. Despite a... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (GABHS) has caused outbreaks in recruit training environments, where it leads to significant morbidity and, on occasion, has been linked to deaths. Streptococcal surveillance has long been a part of military recruit public health activities. All Navy and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

A comprehensive electronic medical record (EMR) represents a rich source of information that can be harnessed for epidemic surveillance. At this time, however, we do not know how EMR-based data elements should be combined to improve the performance of surveillance systems. In a manual EMR review... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Electronic disease surveillance systems can be extremely valuable tools; however, a critical step in system implementation is collection of data. Without accurate and complete data, statistical anomalies that are detected hold little meaning. Many people who have established successful... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (GABHS) has caused outbreaks in recruit training environments, where it leads to significant morbidity and, on occasion, has been linked to deaths. Streptococcal surveillance has long been a part of military recruit public health activities. All Navy and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality, with attendant costs of roughly $10 billion for treatment and up to $77 billion in indirect costs annually. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducts annual influenza surveillance, and includes measures of inpatient and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Office of the Medical Examiner (OME) is a statewide system for investigation of sudden and unexpected death in Utah. OME, in the Utah Department of Health (UDOH), certified over 2000 of the 13,920 deaths in Utah in 2008.

Information from OME death investigations is currently stored in... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Previous reports have demonstrated the media’s influence on ED visits in situations such as dramatized acetaminophen overdose, media report of celebrity suicides, television public announcements for early stroke care and cardiac visits following President Clinton’s heart surgery. No previous... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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