Welcome to the Surveillance Knowledge Repository

Click on a topic under the Key Topic Areas section in the left column, then select a resource  from the list of resources that appear for that topic. You may also search for specific topics by entering one or more keywords in the Search bar. You can filter the search results by Content Type, Year, or Author Name.

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There are a number of Natural Language Processing (NLP) annotation and Information Extraction (IE) systems and platforms that have been successfully used within the medical domain. Although these groups share components of their systems, there has not been a successful effort in the medical... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The HL7 messaging standard, version two that was implemented by most vendors and public health agencies did not resolve all systems’ interoperability problems. Design and tool implementation for automated machine-testing messages may resolve many of those problems. This task also has critical... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Standard vocabulary facilitates the routing and filtering of laboratory data to various public health programs. In 2008, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) developed 67 Technical Implementation Guides (TIGs) that accompany each condition and contain standard codes for NNC... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the PHIN Messaging Guide for Syndromic Surveillance v. 1. In the intervening years, new technological advancements including Electronic Health Record capabilities, as well as new epidemiological and Meaningful Use... Read more

Content type: Abstract

As the knowledge required to support case reporting evolves from unstructured to more structured and standardized formats, it becomes suitable for electronic clinical decision support (CDS). CDS for case reporting confronts two challenges: a) While EHRs are moving toward local CDS capabilities,... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security National Incident Management System (NIMS) establishes a common framework and common terminology that allows diverse incident management and support organizations to work together across a wide variety of functions and hazard scenarios1. Using common... Read more

Content type: Abstract

As part of the French syndromic surveillance system SurSaUDî, the French Public Health Agency (Sant© publique France) collects daily data from the emergency department (ED) network OSCOUR®. The system aims to timely identify, follow and assess the health impact of unusual or seasonal events on... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Presented: Thursday, January 12, 2012

This presentation will describe the implementation of assessment and reporting of public health events under the IHR framework by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The presenter will discuss the process of assessment and... Read more

Content type: Webinar

Cost-effective, flexible and innovative tools that integrate disparate data sets and allow sharing of information between geographically dispersed collaborators are needed to improve public health surveillance practice. Gossamer Health (Good Open Standards System for Aggregating, Monitoring and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Domains go through phases of existence, and the electronic disease surveillance domain is no different. This domain has gone from an experimental phase, where initial prototyping and research tried to define what was possible, to a utility phase where the focus was on determining what tools and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, CDC programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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