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We evaluated several classifications of emergency department (ED) syndromic data to ascertain best syndrome classifications for ILI.

Content type: Abstract

In development for over fourteen years, ESSENCE is a disease surveillance system utilized by public health stakeholders at city, county, state, regional, national, and global levels. The system was developed by a team from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) with... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Advanced surveillance systems require expertise from the fields of medicine, epidemiology, biostatistics, and information technology to develop a surveillance application that will automatically acquire, archive, process and present data to the user. Additionally, for a surveillance system to be... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Data streams related to case severity have been added to the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE), a disease-monitoring application used by the Department of Defense (DoD), as an additional analytic capability to alert the user when... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The practice of real-time disease surveillance, sometimes called syndromic surveillance, is widespread at local, state, and national levels. Diseases ignore legal boundaries, so situations frequently arise where it is important to share surveillance information between public health ... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC) supports the development of new analytical tools to improve alerting in the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE) disease-monitoring application used by the Department of Defense (DoD... Read more

Content type: Abstract

When the Chicago Bears met the Indianapolis Colts for Super Bowl XLI in Miami in January, 2007, fans from multiple regions visited South Florida for the game. In the past, public health departments have instituted heightened local surveillance during mass gatherings due to concerns about... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Early and reliable detection of anomalies is a critical challenge in disease surveillance. Most surveillance systems collect data from multiple data streams but the majority of monitoring is performed at univariate time series level. Purely statistical methods used in disease surveillance look... Read more

Content type: Abstract

One of the challenges facing developers and users of automated disease surveillance systems is being able to accurately evaluate the performance of their systems for the wide variety of public health threats that are possible. A variety of methods have been used in the past to create data sets... Read more

Content type: Abstract

On 27 April 2005, a simulated bioterrorist event—the aerosolized release of Francisella tularensis in the men’s room of luxury box seats at a sports stadium—was used to exercise the disease surveillance capability of the National Capital Region (NCR). The objective of this exercise was to permit... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, CDC programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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