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This document, released February 18, 2019, focuses on several key areas related to syndrome definition creation, including the basics behind a syndrome definition, steps to build a syndrome, evaluation of a new (or old) definition, and dissemination.

Starting in November of 2016, the ISDS... Read more

Content type: References

On 3/29/2017, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health (MCDPH) received three reports of confirmed HAV infection from an onsite clinic at Campus A that assists individuals experiencing homelessness, a population at risk for HAV transmission. To identify the scope of the problem, the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In January 2017, the NSSP transitioned their BioSense analytical tools to Electronic Surveillance System for Early Notification of Community-Based Epidemics (ESSENCE). The chief complaint field in BioSense 2.0 was a concatenation of the record's chief complaint, admission reason, triage notes,... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Final Four-associated events culminated in four days of intense activity from March 31st through April 3rd, and added an estimated 400,000 visitors to Maricopa County's 4.2 million residents.

Objective:

To describe and present results for the enhanced epidemiologic surveillance... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In general, data from public health surveillance can be used for short- and long-term planning and response through retrospective data analysis of trends over time or specific events. Combining health outcome data (e.g., hospitalizations or deaths) with environmental and socio-demographic... Read more

Content type: Report

The rate of drug overdose deaths in the United States has increased steadily since 2000. Injection drug use, a practice associated with infectious disease transmission, has likely increased along with this upward trend in drug overdoses. Injection drug use surveillance is difficult to conduct at... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Timely identification of arboviral disease is key to prevent transmission in the community, but traditional surveillance may take up to 14 days between specimen collection and health department notification. Arizona state and county health agencies began monitoring National Syndromic... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Arizona reports an average of 116 cases of West Nile virus (WNV) each year, and in 2015, Arizona saw a reemergence of St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus. In addition, Arizona is at risk for importation of viruses such as chikungunya, dengue, and Zika due to an abundance of Aedes aegypti... Read more

Content type: Success Stories

This syndrome attempts to capture acute GSW hospital visits and was developed based on existing syndromes shared by the community of practice in this forum post: https://www.healthsurveillance.org/forums/Posts.aspx?topic=1452124
This syndrome attempts to capture acute GSW emergency... Read more

Content type: Syndrome

This syndrome attempts to capture Opioid, Cocaine and Meth Injection Drug Use hospital visits. The syndrome was developed using NSSP ESSNECE and evaluated on Maricopa County emergency department and inpatient data. Fields used in ESSENCE include Admit Reason Combo, Cheif Complaint History and... Read more

Content type: Syndrome

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, CDC programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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