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Per a frequently asked questions document on the ISDS website, approximately two thirds of HL7 records received in BioSense do not provide a Visit ID. As a result, BioSense data processing rules use the patient ID, facility ID and earliest date in the record to identify a unique visit. If the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The North Carolina Bioterrorism and Emerging Infection Prevention System (NC BEIPS) serves public health users across North Carolina at the local, regional and state levels, providing syndromic surveillance capabilities.  At the state level, our primary users are in the General Communicable... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance data have been widely shown to be useful to large health departments. Use at smaller local health departments (LHDs) has rarely been described, and the effectiveness of various methods of delivering syndromic surveillance data and information to smaller health departments ... Read more

Content type: Abstract

A local foundation commissioned a project to determine the leading causes of childhood injury in Wake County, NC. Multiple sources of secondary data, including syndromic surveillance data, were used to describe leading causes of childhood injury in the county.

Objective

To utilize... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The UNC Department of Emergency Medicine (UNC DEM) conducted an online survey to better understand the surveillance needs of Infection Control Practitioners (ICPs) in North Carolina and solicit feedback on the utility of the North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Over the last few decades, the United States has made considerable progress in decreasing the incidence of motor vehicle occupants injured and killed in traffic collisions.1 However, there is still a need for continued motor vehicle crash (MVC) injury surveillance, particularly for vulnerable... Read more

Content type: Abstract

NC DETECT receives ICD-9-CM codes for emergency department (ED) visits and uses these codes in case definitions for syndromic surveillance (e.g. infectious disease, injury, etc.). Hospitals will begin using ICD-10-CM codes on October 1, 2015. As a result, preparations have been made to... Read more

Content type: Abstract

NC DETECT receives data on at least a daily basis from five data sources: emergency departments (ED), the statewide poison center (CPC), the statewide EMS data collection system, a regional wildlife center and laboratories from the NC State College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Web portal is... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Suicide is a leading cause of mortality in the United States, causing about 45,000 deaths annually. Research suggests that universal screening in health care settings may be beneficial for prevention, but few studies have combined detailed suicide circumstances with ED encounter data to better... Read more

Content type: Abstract

A retrospective analysis of emergency department data in NC for drug and opioid overdoses has been explained previously [1]. We built on this initial work to develop new poisoning and surveillance reports to facilitate near real time surveillance by health department and hospital users. In North... Read more

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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